Tag Archives: Nationals Park

Nationals Park is a baseball stadium opened in Southeast Washington D.C. for the Washington Nationals. I was at the first game and my father-in-law was part of the construction.

Capitals Winter Classic at Nationals Park reactions

A couple of days ago, the Washington Capitals unveiled uniforms and the rink layout for the 2015 Winter Classic at Nationals Park. On hand were Alex Ovechkin, Nicklas Backstrom and Braden Holtby.

I had expected something with the Caps’ “Weagle” logo that combines the letter W with the Capitol dome, an eagle and the tip of the Washington Monument. Instead, they went a completely different direction, going with fauxback that evokes the memories of some minor league teams that called D.C. home (Monumental Network). My initial thought was they reminded me a bit of some of the Washington Senators logos (Sportslogos.net). Thinking a little more, I thought they looked like the kind of fauxbacks you might see in a place like Bannana Republic or some of those other casual fashion stores I don’t shop at, so maybe not a perfect comparison.

They did manage to squeeze in the top of the Washington Monument to the W. As one does.

Overall, they aren’t bad. They went with what I would call “Willard Preacher red” instead of the traditional red. The three stars on the chest and sleeves are a good touch that should be included on the regular uniforms. I don’t mind all the stripes either, though I won’t go as far to say that I like them. They even capitalized CAPITALS!

The design’s reaction has been mixed.

I think they are growing on me, but I’m in no hurry to go out and buy a sweater.

Like other Winter Classics played at ballparks, the rink placement is more about how it looks on TV than maximizing the best possible view for the most spectators. I would think that putting the rink along one of the baselines would probably make the most sense. That being said, if someone wants to help me get tickets, I’ll get over it.

Why did it take so long for this to get made official? Mark Lerner, a Nationals owner and Caps minority owner:

Multi-tasking, man. HARD.

There was of course cross-team tomfoolery

MORE READING
Wednesday Caps Clips: Winter Classic Attire Revealed; Capitals @ Bruins Game DayJapers Rink


For Barry Trotz and wife, transition to Washington centers around son with Down syndrome
The Post

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Remember when a Nats exec leaked the Capitals’ Winter Classic to Nationals Park news?

About three weeks @VCamillo_Nats, the twitter account of Washington Nationals Chief Revenue & Marketing Officer Valerie Camillo sent out a tweet with a this photograph:

Untitled

I surmised that she had just leaked that the NHL Winter Classic would be at Nationals Park:

The tweet was quickly deleted, but got several retweets, though none from some of the MSM folks that follow me.

A week later, it was finally made official that the 2015 Winter Classic between the hometown Capitals and the visiting Chicago Blackhawks (washingtoncaps.com) would take place at Nationals Park.

A few thoughts:

Nationals Park which is literally just 15 blocks from the U.S. Capitol was the obvious choice from the beginning. I criticized the NHL and the Caps/Ted Leonsis for not picking the venue outright. Baltimore venues were even under consideration which would have been completely unacceptable. They finally got it right, but it took much too long.

It isn’t unreasonable to suggest that the 2011 Winter Classic in Pittsburgh is the high-water mark of the Alex Ovechkin era. They beat the arch nemesis Penguins in the rain that night, but shortly thereafter, Bruce Boudreau was fired as coach. Though the reached the second round under both Dale Hunter and Adam Oates, it seems like the last time the Caps did well on a big stage. Last season, they didn’t even make the playoffs.

The choice of the Blackhawks seems like an effort to get President Obama to a game, but the Chicagoan goes to Hawaii for the holidays, doesn’t he?

The logo for the Caps appears to have leaked today (Russian Machine Never Breaks) and it’s a surprise. A fairly simple W and three stars; a fauxback seemingly to a time well before the Caps existed. It looks more like something out of the Washington Senators history than the Caps. We’ll find out on Tuesday with tomorrow’s event when the uniforms are unveiled.

This is the Caps 40th anniversary season which makes you feel old.

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BeltwayLand beer: History, more on Nats Park beer

It’s time again for my monthly-ish round-up of BeltwayLand and beyond beer news.

WETA has a brief feature on brewing in the D.C. area with Garrett Peck, author of Capital Beer: A Heady History of Brewing in Washington, D.C. (I need to get it) which gives the broad history of beer in the area. Fun fact – Robert Portner developed air conditioning to make lager beer year round at his Alexandria brewery. Two of his great-granddaughters are going to open Portner Brewhouse in Alexandria, details TBD. They are also mentioned in Washingtonian‘s Women in Washington’s Craft Beer Scene. Now, on with our feature presentation:

The beer map! The Annual Nationals Park Beer Guide is up on The Nationals Review. Service blogging!

Beergraphs.com also visited Nationals Park recently and gave it an 86 (B).

Devil's Backbone Vienna Lager

Devil’s Backbone Vienna Lager won The Post’s Beer Madness, a regional beer tournament (that’s a big region). I’m a fan and have been since I tried it at the behest of Slow States. Once I found it. It’s now my go-to during my now infrequent trips to the Vienna Inn, but I can’t seem to find it in stores of late. Harris Teeter shaved off $2 from the price of a six-pack, so that may be part of the reason. Overall, it seems harder to find local/regional beers in grocery stores of late, is anybody else noticing that?

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District Drafts - Local beers at Nationals Park, Washington, D.C.

Local beer is a part of DC’s past and now it’s present and the Nats are helping

We are three years into the greater Washington D.C. brewing revival and things are going well. The Washington Business Journal covered it in a recent issue.

With craft brewing boom, D.C.’s beer scene returns to its regional roots

The one thing that today’s beer businesses have in common with the District’s brewers of old? A regional focus.

The heyday of Washington brewing was probably in the 1850s and 1860s, when tons of breweries sprung up to produce lager for the many Union soldiers stationed around the city. Eventually, the smaller, family-owned breweries closed, leaving about six huge breweries serving the region.

Those breweries were well known and respected businesses, according to Peck. Their founders also owned real estate, started banks and operated rail networks. Robert Portner, whose brewing company sat where Trader Joe’s is now located on Washington Street in Alexandria, distributed his beer by rail throughout the south.

The largest Washington brewer, and the only one that survived Prohibition, was the Christian Heurich Brewing Co. (Heurich sold ice during the 1920s to keep his business solvent.) Booze may have been able to flow freely, but that didn’t mean all was well for the brewer. One side effect of “The Noble Experiment” was the strengthening of huge, national beer companies.

“By the 1930s, there had emerged a national media market for advertising, so the ones who best competed in that were the national brewers, rather than the regional brewers like Heurich,” Peck said. “The smaller brewers couldn’t compete, and the national beer market really consolidated in the years after Prohibition.”

Make sure you read the rest of the story, along with this one, How the Nats are feeding D.C.’s beer industry:

Nationals Park. The home of the Washington Nationals, which first, added local craft beer offerings to its concessions last year with two District Draft carts featuring local brews, is adding two more carts this year. And some local craft beers will be sold on draft and in cans throughout the season at the Red Porch and at other Baseline Brew locations throughout the stadium.

The Nationals expect to increase the amount of craft beer sold at the District Draft carts by 50 percent — from about 40 kegs per home stand last year to at least 60 kegs per home stand this year.

“I don’t expect it to double, but it’s going to be tough to tell,” said Jonathan Stahl, senior director of guest experience and hospitality operations for the Nationals. “What we don’t know right now is are we just spreading the same crowd from last year or are we going to be appealing to a broader audience. I think it’ll be somewhere in between.”

I’ve been working on a story on the local craft brew industry — Shameless plug: The story comes out in our Friday print edition — and the demand from the Nationals repeatedly came up during interviews.

The stadium will feature beer from most of the big names in local brewing: D.C. Brau, 3 Stars Brewing Co., Atlas Brew Works, Port City Brewing Co., Mad Fox Brewing Co. and Flying Dog Brewing Co.

The relatively new Atlas Brew Works might have the biggest presence, with plans for its beers to be featured at both the carts and on draft at the Red Porch during each home stand.

There is even more exciting Nats beer news:

In addition to offering more local craft beer throughout the stadium, the Nats are also launching a new promotion: Firkin Fridays, which will feature two local beers in cask on Fridays of each home stand. First up on opening day, April 4, will be beers from D.C. Brau and Flying Dog, although the exact beers haven’t been finalized yet.

Yesterday, Atlas Brew Works announced that a new beer brewed exclusively for the ballpark – Atlas Brew Works Teams Up with the Washington Nationals to offer The 1500 South Cap Lager Exclusively at Nationals Park:

The 1500 South Cap Lager, named after the address of Nationals Park, is a 4.8% Helles lager that will be a great compliment to a sunny day in the stands. “The 1500 is an American spin on a traditional German style pale lager. It features light malt notes and earthy American hops,” said Will Durgin, Atlas’ Head Brewer. The beer will be available at locations throughout the three levels of the ballpark the Red Porch Restaurant in Center Field Plaza.

I am eager to try it, though I wish the press release came out on a day other than April 1.

It’s great to see the Nats are embracing the local brewing scene and probably good business for them too. Given a choice of marked up beers available, I’m inclined to support the local one, even if it’s a dollar or two more.

Nationals Park is said to be the 5th best ballpark for craft breweries (WTOP) and that was before this year’s upgrades. There are new foods available too (DC Sports Bog, The Post), though I’ll stick to Ben’s half-smokes.

It’s a great time to be a beer drinker and baseball fan in BeltwayLand and I think it’s only getting better.

UPDATE

I’ve added DC Sports Bog’s post about the beer in the ballpark: The local craft beer at Nats Park

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Nats: The Curly W used to be on road signs, why it isn’t anymore

Photo used with permission of Flickr user SteelYankee
A few weeks ago, DC Sports Bog (The Post) answered a reader question about why the Washington Nationals “curly W” logo was removed from signs along Interstate 395 (Southwest Freeway) for Nationals Park: What happened to the Curly W on D.C. freeway signs?. Presumably, the curly W’s will are have already been removed from other roads like I-695 (Southeast Freeway) and I-295 (Anacostia Freeway).

Something similar happened in 2010 when the Maryland State Highway Administration removed curly W logos from big green signs too. Frankly, I was surprised they were there in the first place. I inquired with the SHA back then and was told they violated the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) standards. A follow-up email was never answered by SHA and I never got back to writing about those signs, though I did note that both the Washington Redskins & FedEx Field (located at EXIT 16 of I-95/495 Capital Beltway) and the Baltimore Orioles, Baltimore Ravens and M&T Bank Stadium logos were still posted. One wonders why just one team was removed, but I’ll let you draw your own conclusions.

In the DCRoads.net Facebook group, Mike Tantillo, a member of the National Committee on Uniform Traffic Control Device gave some me more background the rationale:

In no other city are the sports team logos placed on the signs. And a symbol is technically defined as a pictogram, which the official definition states is a symbol that represents a government agency or other public sector institution. The public sector bit was inserted into the MUTCD for the specific purpose of preventing entities like sports teams and shopping malls from putting their symbols up on primary guide signs (they would be allowed on the “attractions” category of Specific Service/logo signs…along with gas, food, lodging, etc.).

So naturally after arguing the point about public sector vs. private sector in front of the National Committee on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, FHWA was none-too-amused when these logos showed up on the signs right next to their headquarters. So FHWA challenged DDOT and Maryland SHA on the use of the logos, saying that these did not represent pictograms and would therefore have to become “experimental” and go through human factors testing, just like any other experimental traffic control device.

So they did the human factors testing, and they had to prove that the curly W’s actually enhanced drivers’ ability to find Nats Park, without being a distraction…which is the same standard given to an experiment of any other traffic control device. As part of the experiment, DDOT and Maryland SHA had to agree that they would hold funds in reserve to abort the experiment if there were safety concerns or the results were not positive. In this case, the results were inconclusive and showed a distraction, therefore the experimental signs were removed according to the agreement that DDOT and SHA had with Federal Highway Administration.

In order for a symbol to be effective, it has to be simple, easily recognizable, and its meaning needs to be easily understood by all drivers, even those who have not been “taught” in advance what it means. I think DDOT would have had more successful experiment if they had placed a sign saying “Nationals Park, follow ‘W’ “, and then just used the W like a trailblazer. In this circumstance, you’ve taught the unfamiliar non-local driver (remember, that is who we design signs for) what the ‘W’ means in terms of the traffic/road sign context. However part of me thinks that DDOT didn’t originally intend for the W’s to be part of a navigational exercise and thought they could just slap them on as taxpayer-funded advertising for a private enterprise. And lots of it, seeing as these were on primary guide signs, so they were repeated multiple times in a sequence.

I don’t find fault with the decision to remove the curly W, though I would have thought it was a much more useful than their tests showed. That’s why I’m the road geek highway enthusiast and the transportation professionals make the decisions. Note, this line of thinking is not at all applicable to things like analysis of sports or other things of great import.

Having commercial logos on official signs is certainly problematic so that’s reason enough for me, even as a Nats fan. The publicly financed stadium is more than enough. I certainly hope that Maryland has removed those other team logos as they did, so swiftly, with the curly W.

I wonder if the DC United logos have been removed as well.

By the way, it isn’t unheard of for mass transit systems to use team logos in their stations — I remember seeing an Expos sign in the Pie-IX Metro when I visited Montreal in September 2004. I think the Addison stop on Chicago’s L has Cubs logos too. The Nats wanted WMATA to add the curly W to the Metro map and signage (JDLand), but the transit agency declined. By the way, if you are wanting a transit system to add your logo, you may want to think about putting down a deposit to keep the system running.

Lastly, the conversation that came with posting the DC Sports Bog story made me realize that one of my favorite posts, comparing the Nats cap to other post-expansion caps, was lost in a migration. I’ve put it up again. Yay.

Opening Day is 43 days away

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District Drafts - Local beers at Nationals Park, Washington, D.C.

Port City turns 3; DC Brau expands distribution; more local stands at Nationals Park

It’s time for yet another round up of the greater Washington D.C. area brewing scene.

Business is BrewingNorthern Virginia Magazine

PORT CITY TURNS 3
Port City bar
January 31 is the third anniversary for Alexandria’s Port City Brewing Co. They are celebrating with COLOSSAL THREE, a Hellerbock. There are several other events going on.

Some bad news if your like oyster beer though:

DC BRAU INCREASES DISTRIBUTION
Sunday's lunch - chili half-smoke with DC Brau
DC BRAU EXPANDS DISTRIBUTION THROUGHOUT MARYLAND
Brewery Teams with Legends Ltd to Distribute Flagship Brews in 20 Counties & Baltimore City

Washington, DC – Get ready, Maryland, DC Brau is coming! Fans of DC BRAU in Baltimore, Annapolis and even as close to DC as National Harbor won’t have to wait much longer to enjoy the brewery’s offerings at their favorite locals. Starting this week, DC BRAU will begin working with Legends Limited (http://greatbrewers.com/legends-limited) to distribute five of its signature beers in 20 more counties in Maryland, plus Baltimore City.

DC Brau launches Eastern Pennsylvania distribution with Bella Vista next week

MORE LOCAL BEER AT NATIONALS PARK THIS SUMMER
District Drafts

In a press release about the Washington Nationals extending their agreement with Levy Restaurants was buried this good news:

Fan favorite spot, District Drafts, will have two new locations – creating a total of four locations around the park – and feature local taps from DC Brau, 3 Stars Brewing Company, Port City Brewing Company and more.

Now at least $9 beers will be local!

SAVOR

Savor, The “the benchmark event in craft beer and food pairing”, returns to its Washington, D.C. home, at the National Building Museum, on May 9 and 10, 2014″ features several local & regional breweries according to YOURS FOR GOOD FERMENTABLES.

LAST YEAR IN BEER

2013: The Year in Beer

Best Of 2013: The Year In Beer, Reviewed DCist

VOTE YOUR FAVORITE LOCAL BREWERY
I’ve seen at least two breweries tweet a link to the CityPaper’s Best of D.C. Readers Poll already.

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Some details on why Nats postponement took so long

Washington Nationals postpone game after hours of uncertaintyThe Post
More details about the Washington Nationals decision to postpone last night’s game against the Atlanta Braves after the shooting at the Navy Yard yesterday.

District Mayor Vincent C. Gray said in a phone interview that he wasn’t involved with every detail of the postponement, but that he wished the decision had been made earlier. He said he feared letting thousands of people near the area of an ongoing investigation.

Paul A. Quander Jr., deputy mayor for public safety and justice, said he first spoke with the Nationals at 1 p.m., and that the team initially wanted to play the game. Police were confident they could clear South Capitol Street and parts of M Street SE in time to accommodate stadium traffic. “We were going to make it work,” he said.

But as the search for people of interest in the shooting continued, and Lanier warned people to stay away from the Navy Yard area, the Nationals contacted city officials about a possible postponement, Quander said. He said the Nationals informed him they would need the approval of Major League Baseball.

“It was a fluid situation,” he said. “But I think they made the right call.”

To me and seemingly every Nats fan I follow on twitter, postponing the game was the obvious call before 1 p.m. While it police may have been confident they could get M Street cleared before the game, was that the best use of District resources at the time? Additionally, with one of the parking areas being used as a gathering place for families, it seemed to me the Nats should have erred on the side of caution and of consideration for the families waiting in the parking area. Why potentially make it harder for them to arrive and depart?

Another factor to consider, the players on either team were not interested in playing the game last night.

Lastly, there are policies and procedures that need to be re-evaluated by both the District, the team and Major League Baseball. Since Nationals Park is owned by the District, though operated by the franchise, it should have the authority to shut down a game. The Nats should also be able to postpone a game due to unforeseen events and not have to get the backing of MLB or more likely, some old man in Milwaukee.

PREVIOUSLY

UPDATE: Postponed, finally – EARLIER: Nats should just postpone tonight’s game

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Are Nationals Park naming rights in play? I don’t really care

Nationals Park sign near home plate
Nationals owners may be waiting for the perfect pitch to sell park’s naming rightsThe Post
Nationals Park was expected to be a temporary name for the home of the Washington Nationals, yet 5 years and 5 days after it opened, the name has become “permanent.” Wrong again, Stan Kasten.

Now, with the team much improved on the field and filled with superstars, is a new sponsored name on the way? That’s what The Post is wondering “Should the Nats sell the naming rights to Nationals Park?

I don’t really care.

I love Nationals Park as much as any other fan, but we’re not talking about renaming Yankee Stadium, Fenway Park, etc. The expectation of the modern stadium is that it gets some sort of corporate name, ideally from a local/regional company that people like, but that doesn’t always happen. Does anybody care that the hockey/basketball arena in town has been named after phone companies? Not that I’m aware of — it even gets called “The Phone Booth” though our kids might wonder what a “phone booth” is since the last one in the area is long gone. Heck, I hear the ballpark called so many different things in D.C. media – Nats Park, Nationals Stadium, Nationals Park, Nats Stadium, etc. So, go ahead sell the rights, I’ll get over it really quickly, especially since the revenue will make up for not having their own TV rights.

PREVIOUSLY:
Naming rights and Tomo Tomo TomoNovember 26, 2006
I pondered potential names and reported Tomo Ohka might be interested in returning. The Jim Bowden era!

OLD RUMOR: I had forgotten about it until Wednesday morning, but I recall overhearing from somebody with ties to ExxonMobil that the oil company was poised to sign up for the Nationals Park naming rights, but the District of Columbia expressed opposition to that partnership. We might have been going to the “gas station” to watch the Nats all these years.

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