Tag Archives: Sabrett

The most popular brand of New York City hot dog carts. Very tasty!

Sea Isle City by Segway

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SEA ISLE CITY, N.J. — I think it was in 2000 when my friend Tom told me about what would become known as the Segway. He was quite proud of the fact he accurately determined that the Dean Kamen’s project IT or Ginger was some sort of scooter with gyroscopes, and was talking to a Times reporter about it. Now, many years later, Segways are well-known, and something I see around my office campus and downtown D.C. regularly. Videos of the Capitals on Segways in downtown D.C. were greeted with much enthusiasm. Up until this week, however, I had never been on one.

In June, I opened an email from Jamie Connor of Moving Foward Rentals, a company that offers Segway tours of Sea Isle City. Connor offered me two free rentals in exchange for “an open post on your blog describing your experience (no matter how critical).” Since Sea Isle City is only “two beaches up” from Stone Harbor, I took him up on the offer on Tuesday. Erica joined me, as did my father, who paid his own way (about $40).

Upon our arrival, we watched s safety/how-to video that proved to be quite entertaining. We learned that improper Segway use could be very hazardous to the stick figure on the DVD, or us. Following the video, Kimi, our tour guide, demonstrated how to safely use a Segway and helped all of us “get our wheels.” She predicted that two of the riders, both of whom may have the same first name that starts with a “W”, would be trouble. After several minutes rolling around the showroom, we were ready to roll out on our tour. Oh and there were release forms to fill out. If you do rent a Segway, you probably don’t want to destroy it.

Kimi took us through the bay side of Sea Isle to start. Our tour was initially along mostly empty streets. There were several straightaways that gave us the opportunity to open up the Segways and reach the maximum allowable speed of 12 MPH. Here Kimi’s suspicion was confirmed as one rider was forcibly dismounted by a curb. The other troublemaker was disappointed to be too slow to get out the camera, but was pleased there was no serious injury. That rider was also quite pleased to see that the governor switch that restricts the speed to 12 MPH was imperfect and that a top speed of 13.1 MPH was achieved. Actually, that is the top known speed, so it could have been a little faster.

After some time riding along city streets, Kimi directed us to the asphalt promenade that Sea Isle City calls its boardwalk. Here we had the additional challenge of navigating around walkers, cyclists, skateboarders and park benches. Along the way, Kimi chatted with us and the family of four that was part of the tour. She was quite personable.

After the boardwalk ended, we were back on the streets of Sea Isle City. I saw the unmistakable umbrella of a Sabrett hot dog stand and decided to stop and get one. My wife and father also indulged. Steering the Segway with one hand was not too hard, but I certainly kept my speed lower.

Riding a Segway with a Sabrett in hand...

The tour continued for a little while longer and wrapped around back to the Moving Forward storefront. In all, we were probably out for about 90 minutes. It was quite enjoyable, we all had a good time. I enjoyed riding a Segway, and hope to have another opportunity. It only took a few minutes to get used to it. After the tour, we were all given Moving Forward t-shirts as well. My dad noted that Moving Forward might want to include a sign out front that indicates a lesson was included in the rental, so that potential customers who have never used a Segway would not be intimidated, which struck me as a good point. Otherwise, we were pleased with Moving Forward; their Segway tour was one of the most memorable parts of our vacation.

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Pentagon City

After over six years of calling the Pentagon City neighborhood of Arlington County home, I officially (as in the lease expires) end my tenure there today. I am living in our new condo in Alexandria. Although Pentagon City would never be mistaken for a classic neighborhood it has been a wonderful place to live and leaving is bittersweet.

When I started looking for a place to live in late 2000, I decided it was very important to live near a Metro station. I also wanted to be able to walk to some amenities like a grocery store and some restaurants. Since I had no interest in living in the District (voting rights, poor parking/services. etc.) I focused my search on Arlington and Alexandria. Almost as a joke, I looked at Riverhouse, a three building apartment community on several acres. My father had lived there in the late 1960s so I figured I’d check it out. When I got there and saw what the rental rates were, I was pleasantly surprised to see they were below what the Orange Line corridor. Seeing that Pentagon Row was being built, I knew I’d get the amenities I was hoping for in a location. I signed a lease and moved there in early January 2001. In April 2004, Erica and I moved in together in a larger apartment. I’ll have a more to say in a separate post about my apartment complex, Riverhouse.

Here are some of the things I loved about Pentagon City (in no particular order):

Location, location, location: 10-15 minutes from downtown D.C. by Metro. A ten minute walk to 23rd Street in Crystal City. Abutting I-395 and only five minutes from I-66. Within two or three miles of several major bike trails. National Airport is two Metro stops away.

The views

The Washington Monument, The Capitol, The National Cathedral and now the Air Force memorial; it will be unusual not seeing those daily.

Pentagon Row — The mixed-use development meant that I had an Eckerd, Harris Teeter, Subway and several restaurants, Hudson Trail Outfitters and Bed, Bath & Beyond within a five minute walk. The plaza is fairly well designed as a public, filling it with people whenever the weather cooperates.

Eye candy — there are so many good looking women in Pentagon City, you can hardly get on an elevator without being in the presence of a hottie. Some of them are as almost pretty as Erica :). By the way, she says the guys are okay too.

Sine — On the whole, the food is pretty uninspiring across the board with one great exception — the baked potato soup. That stuff is so good. The beer selection is also strong. The wings are also pretty good.

Parks

The grassy area in front of building was made into a Grace Murray Hopper Park , providing an excellent buffer between my building and the rest of Pentagon City. On the other side of Joyce Street are softball fields and and soccer pitch.

Sabrett Hot Dog stand

I was delighted to find that Pentagon City had a hot dog stand (one of my criteria for a downtown area, the other is taxi availability — more later) at the Metro station and even more so that it was Sabrett. Sadly, it appears the stand stopped selling hot dogs last last month, coinciding with my relocation. Coincidence?

Pentagon Row Ice Rink

Sure, it is tiny, but for being a block away from my apartment, I wasn’t complaining. Erica and I had a lot of fun skating there over the years. Putting it there was a brilliant decision by Pentagon Row.

The Fashion Centre and Pentagon Centre — Malls and big box stores don’t do much for me, but a lot of that is because you have to drive to a nasty parking lot. These two facilities meant I could shop without driving.

Living there was great and I could go on and on about how much I loved it. I recommend Pentagon City to anyone looking to rent in the D.C. area. Choosing to live there was one of the three smartest things I have ever done. I’ll still show up every now and then too — Fritz still lives there.

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